Home » Cadillac Supervision Switches Hands Internally At Parent General Motors

Cadillac Supervision Switches Hands Internally At Parent General Motors

Cadillac Supervision Switches Hands Internally At Parent General Motors

Cadillac has a new boss internally at its parent company, General Motors, with the automaker’s product chief, Mark Reuss, becoming its superintended.

Whereas ex-Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen reported directly to GM President Daniel Ammann, the luxury brand’s recently-appointed President, Stephen Carlisle, will now report directly to Reuss, who in turn reports into GM CEO and Chairman, Mary Barra.

The move was reportedly made in order to better align Cadillac to the executives’ areas of focus, with Ammann shifting his attention to GM’s self-driving car efforts. Meanwhile, Reuss – who heads up the global GM department responsible design, engineering, safety, quality, research and development, advanced vehicle technology and management, sees his title changed from executive vice president, global product development, to executive vice president and president, global product group and Cadillac.

f=”http://cadillacsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/GM-Daniel-Ammann-2014-Automotive-News-World-Congress.jpg”> Cadillac previously reported into GM President, Dan Ammann (pictured)[/capt

In effect, Reuss remains in charge of product while adding the responsibility of Cadillac vehicles, while Ammann remains President of General Motors, a unique role within GM (similar to that of COO/chief operations officer within other organizations), while also becoming more rooted in the automaker’s autonomous vehicle strategy.

Both Reuss and Ammann will remain in Detroit, but Ammann will spend more time in San Francisco to work with Cruise Automation, an autonomous driving company whose acquisition he spearheaded. We would imagine that, as part of the re-alignment, Reuss will spend more time in New York, where Cadillac is headquartered.

Written by
Alex is the founder of Cadillac Society. He has a deep passion for automotive business strategy and enjoys driving his ATS sedan on twisty mountain roads.

58 Comments

  1. Ammann should be closely following de Nysschen out the door. It is time for GM to realize it is making cars, and not appliances.

    Reply
    • Does that suggest that JdN was in favor of making appliances? If it does, I would contend that this was not the case.

      It’s Ammann who wants to (drastically) cut costs and make Cadillacs as appliance-ey as possible… JdN didn’t share that vision, hence he’s out.

      Reply
  2. In other words, Cadillac has no real leader like Johan was. It’s just a big mess. Cadillac needs a singular person, with the power and responsibility to focus on Cadillac and drive Cadillac into the future. The competition in this segment is fierce, and Cadillac is dead last. It has NO product portfolio other than four sedans and three SUV’s. No COUPES, No CONVERTIBLES, No SPORT WAGONS, No HALO VEHICLE. Whether the Escala makes it into production, as promised, remains to be seen now that the bean counters are in charge…….

    Reply
    • Actually I don’t count the ATS Coupe as it is dead in the water, due to cease production in 2019/2020 with no replacement. The CT3, as I understand it, will be a sedan. The CT5 will be a sedan. And, I heard from rumors,that the CT4 , instead of a Coupe and Conv. variant on the Alpha chassis, along with an all new Sport Wagon, will be a sedan also. So, by 2022, that will leave four sedans and the Escala, and five SUV’s. Not an encouraging line-up……..

      Reply
    • DeNysschen was no leader he was a grave digger. Cadillac is the American luxury brand and these idiots want to make it just another world brand. Will not and has not worked.

      Reply
      • Are you kidding?

        Are you aware of the major internal restructuring performed by JdN during his tenure at Cadillac? It sure doesn’t seem that you are.

        JdN was the only Cadillac leader in the past 15 years to be able to stand up to the status quo at GM, which is now dominated by the likes of Ammann who are focused on profits by cutting costs and delivering inferior products. Ammann ultimately won out, and it’s not a good thing.

        The loss of JdN at Cadillac has set the brand back years… do you think Carlisle will be able to challenge the status quo?

        Reply
      • The notion that “these idiots want to make it just another world brand. Will not and has not worked.”

        First and foremost, calling JdN an idiot is as shitty a word choice as it gets.

        Second, your idea of making Cadillac something other than a better “European” vehicle (whatever that means) is the equivalent of trying to sell kiwis to a market that loves and buys apples.

        The approach is and has been working… but some short-sighted people fail to see it.

        Please check out my previous comment on the matter.

        Reply
  3. NO I am not kidding. deN wanted to make this an European co. like he did Infiniti Nissan was smart enough to kick him out. We had a 2008 CTS Sport, and we got compliments on it until the day we traded it in. Our 2015 ATS Sport Coupe is the only decent looking Cadillac currently. Should go back to names, they sent Amman to electric cars. Get a real American car guy and things will turn around.

    Reply
    • Michael – your perceptions are mis-aligned with reality.

      1. The notion that JdN wanted to make Cadillac “a European co” is simply not true. What he wanted to do is for Cadillac to make products that are desired by the majority of luxury car buyers, which happens to currently be defined by European offerings.

      Explained further: it is far from secret that most luxury car buyers today are buying Mercedes, BMW and Audi. They collectively account for over half of the luxury car sales in the U.S. That percentage is much greater in markets outside North America. You can call it European all you want, but the reality is that the kinds of models provided by these European manufacturers define what the luxury car is today, while representing the sweet spot of the luxury car market… meaning that people WANT and ARE BUYING these kinds of cars. It’s what they expect from a luxury vehicle, plain and simple.

      As such, it would be an ill-advised strategy (and a complete waste of time) to make and market a luxury car that’s different for the sake of being different. It would also be downright silly to try to reinvent the wheel for the sake of reinventing the wheel. Instead, the strategy should entail beating the Germans at their own game – which means making cars that provide a similar kind of driving and overall ownership experience, but doing this even better and at a higher value (temporarily). That’s what Cadillac seemed to be doing under JdN. Unfortunately, this strategy often gets confused by folks like yourself with imitation, but to say that is to totally not understand the luxury car market or the strategic factors involved.

      Put another way: the market wants apples. They eat apples. They buy apples, many of them… they like apples, and have pretty much decided that apples are the best thing to eat. Why try to force the market to eat (and buy) watermelons when you can make a better apple, and sell them by the boatload?

      2. The notion that JdN wanted to turn Infiniti into a European sport lux brand is untrue. Infiniti has always aspired to be a performance luxury brand. This can be traced back to the three pillars (passion, performance, precision) upon which the brand was launched in the 90s. It continues to be true today in its presentations at automotive investment/financial conferences.

      So one can say that Infiniti has always wanted to be better than the German sport luxury brands at their own game. If nothing else, JdN continued to enable that direction during his time at Infiniti.

      That said, he was there for a year, which is not nearly enough time to make any substantial impact or change at an automaker, which have plans drawn up for a decade into the future. Notably, after JdN’s departure for Cadillac, Infiniti embarked on making lackluster new products like the all-new, second-generation QX50, which no longer rides on a standalone Infiniti platform (like the first-gen did), but rather swapped its highly-praised underpinnings for a sub-par, front-drive Nissan platform.

      More importantly, JdN did not get “kicked out” of Infiniti… he left ON HIS OWN accord to join Cadillac. Why would you try to spin it that he was “kicked out” when it’s clearly not the case?

      3. According to you, the ATS Coupe is the only good looking Cadillac model, and I think that it is truly attractive. But it is far from being the ONLY good-looking model in the lineup. Every Cadillac sedan (perhaps except for the XTS) is absolutely stunning and looks better than the competition, from the ATS Sedan, to the CTS, to the CT6.

      I have an ATS Sedan. I get compliments about it a weekly basis.

      Have you seen the refreshed CT6? It’s drop-dead gorgeous… and that was done under JdN… any thoughts on that?

      I’m going to go out on a limb and say that the upcoming CT5 will blow everyone else away in the segment in terms of styling and design. Here’s to hoping that Ammann’s influence hasn’t resulted in a major cheapening of it once it actually comes to market.

      4. About the tired naming argument: names do not make a car’s success. The quality and substance of the cars, how competitive they are in the marketplace and their (brand) perception, determine their commercial success.

      Ultimately, Cadillac’s new naming scheme is not harming it or holding it back. Can you say the same about “actual names”?

      5. I really don’t even want to touch the part of your comment about getting “a real American” to run Cadillac, because it is totally misguided.

      What is needed for Cadillac is a true leader who understands the luxury car market extremely well and who has the guts to stand up to the incumbent GM leadership (i.e. Dan Ammann and company), and be a true catalyst for change. Where this person comes from is completely and entirely irrelevant, especially given that Cadillac’s biggest opportunity lies outside the United States market.

      But if you, for whatever reason, do not subscribe to this line of common sense, then I should remind you that Mark Reuss is an American… and he is the best thing that Cadillac can have at this point in time.

      PS: please use the “reply” button to reply to my comments, which allows us to keep this conversation organized and on track.

      Reply
  4. My verbiage was correct if you like it or not. Cadillacs had American Style when the 2008 CTS and its generation came out. After that all the cars have become quite boring in their style, except for the ATS coupe. I am sorry if you don’t like that, but that is the truth, If it weren’t for the Escalade no buyers would care for Cadillac. Sorry if you don’t like the truth. When I enter a Cadillac showroom while waiting for service it is the loneliest dealership in the area. Don’t bother with another of your excuse laden answers. You must be one of the sycophants. I am a customer, and I cannot get anyone in my neighborhood to believe in the Cadillac mystique any longer. The image is I want to be European, and charge like the top brands, but I really am just a me too.

    Reply
    • I see you still haven’t figured out how to use the reply button.

      If you haven’t figured out how to use that, I do have to wonder what other things you have trouble figuring out… like the concept that styling is an extremely subjective and personal thing, and what you think of design of a car (or a lineup of cars, for that matter) is personal to you, and probably does not represent the opinion of the overall car buying public.

      “Cadillacs had American Style when the 2008 CTS and its generation came out.”

      What is American style? Care to define that? Don’t bother, I’ll explain it to you better than you can.

      Cadillac’s styling is truly unique and is the only serious advantage it has in the marketplace. I would educate you on the results of clinics performed for the original CT6 and the facelifted 2019 CT6, but I don’t think it would help you much… as you are too closed-off to hearing perspectives and ideas that are not your own.

      “My verbiage was correct if you like it or not.” and “I am sorry if you don’t like that”…

      No, your verbiage could not be any more incorrect.

      And it is not about me liking it. It’s not about you liking it. It’s about what’s reality. You’re stating your opinion, based on your twisted perception of reality. I’m stating actual facts from having a decade-long career in the automotive industry and having a keen understanding of the luxury car market.

      What kind of experience is your highly-subjective “opinion” based on? Let me guess – the way you like how something looks. That’s all you’ve got.

      “If it weren’t for the Escalade no buyers would care for Cadillac. ”

      Interesting. I think that the thousands of customers who buy the ATS, CTS, XTS, CT6 and XT5 every month think otherwise.

      And pretty soon, the XT4 will start finding 4-6 THOUSAND new homes per month, boosting Cadillac’s overall sales volume. All those people will probably not care about Cadillac, either, despite driving one every day… right?

      “When I enter a Cadillac showroom while waiting for service it is the loneliest dealership in the area.”

      Ah yes. The illustrious and well-proven man-says example that does not hold up in statistics, nor in educated conversation.

      I do wonder how all the THOUSANDS of new Cadillacs find homes every month. These paying customers probably aren’t going to the dealership where you’re buying them, then. I wonder if it’s one of the stores that sells Chevys and treats Cadillac as an after-thought.

      Besides that, it is common knowledge that Cadillac as a brand is damaged, not because of its current product portfolio, but because of the decisions made during the Roger Smith era, which have plagued Cadillac’s image since then as a result of delivering sub-par products for two decades, starting in the 80s. If the perception of Cadillac as a brand were in alignment with its current line of products, sales would be well over 25,000 units per month. But that concept might be too difficult for you to understand, given that you chose to reply to my factual, detailed comment with more subjective nonsense.

      “Don’t bother with another of your excuse laden answers. You must be one of the sycophants.”

      So because I disagree with your fallacious opinions (ones that do not line up with reality), you feel the need to 1) tell me what to do and then to 2) call me names.

      I see the ability for logic and reason is strong with you. Next! 🙂

      Reply
      • A cultural norm. I guess you have a degree in anthropology, or decided you set the cultural norm. You act like a Democrat, though you may not be one, by your airs. Because you don’t agree with my opinion my opinion is fallacious, amazing. Cadillac used to sell many more cars and was the leader in luxury car sales, the others were blips in America, and you have the right arguments. I guess I am overwhelmed. Don’t bother to reply. Your thinking has done to America what our President is trying to fix.

        Reply
        • You should familiarize yourself with the definition of anthropology. It doesn’t mean what (it appears) you think it means.

          It is quite amusing how you continue avoiding the actual topic and instead are doing your best to turn it into something it is not (a political conversation). People typically do just that when they have no actual rebuttals, which seems the case for you.

          “Cadillac used to sell many more cars and was the leader in luxury car sales, the others were blips in America”

          Correct. Fast forward two or three decades and consumers are no longer looking for Cadillacs from the era you are describing, as those cars became irrelevant. In much the same way, no one is looking to buy rotary phones any more. People have moved on. Some rotary phone makers have not, and they now no longer exist.

          In other words, the industry changed dramatically, and Cadillac lagged significantly behind this change… thanks to Roger Smith and company.

          So you just made the point for the notion that Cadillac must change or disappear.

          Do you have anything useful to contribute to this dialogue?

          Reply
          • Actually, anthropology is the study of the cultures of man. Obviously I do know what it is you want to change it into something it isn’t. The point about Cadillac is that they did dominate, they should have evolved as an American brand not as European brand as deN and you thought they should. The second genderation CTS was a fine example, American style along with becoming a dominating force. deN wanted European style, and made Cadillac irrelevant. Escalade is obviously American style and power. You bore me with your fallacious analogy. Being American is not old fashioned, America has and will set the tone for the world. Who said Roger Smith was any good. Make Cadillac be outstandingly stylish, elegant, technically up to date in the American way. Not a me too European way.

            Reply
            • So let me get this straight: your entire argument is about styling? Thousands of new Cadillac buyers disagree with you every month, yet you keep bemoaning a topic that is as subjective as ever. Good argument, keep it up!

              Why don’t you post a rebuttal to my previous comments?

              Reply
  5. I have to wonder why you don’t see I don’t care if I use the reply button. Cadillac was not on an upswing when deN was let go, anymore than Infiniti. Obviously, you have trouble with reading comprehension. I bought an ATS coupe. I will not bother answering you any further, your line of reasoning is so faulty, fallacious, and pompous there is no way for you to see yourself as others see you and Cadillac.

    Reply
    • Oh cmon Michael. Why not state the real reason you’ll stop answering – that your lame excuse for an argument (if you can call it that) has more holes than Swiss cheese.

      I should not have to explain not defend the use of the reply button… but if you insist, I’ll play.

      When talking to someone in person, one faces them and looks them in the eye. One does not do a 180 and start yelling in the general direction where the partner of their conversation is not physically located. It’s just a normally accepted cultural norm that is both polite and a custom across many cultures. Agreed?

      In the same vein, you use the reply button when talking to someone on the internet. If you haven’t figure it out, I wonder how you managed to figure out how to drive an automobile, let alone get into one.

      But hey, at least I still manage to keep basic conversational etiquette despite disagreeing with your plebeian and sophomoric opinions.

      Reply
  6. PPS:I don’t live in an area that has combined Cadillac and Chevrolet, love my Z06. I live in South Florida where we have several Cadillac and Chevrolet dealers. Your are a pompous a– with your bs.

    Reply
    • At least I can be one of those ^^^ with a properly-developed opinion.

      By comparison, all you have so far boils down to you not liking the design of Cadillacs, a subjective opinion that thousands of new Cadillac customers do not subscribe to… while calling me names and not at all addressing any of the things I have said.

      When you’re ready to have an informed and intelligent conversation based on facts, rather than half-witted opinion, do come back – I’ll be right here waiting.

      Reply
      • You are a pompous, you know what. Maybe you should read Peter Delorenzo on Autoextremist, and what he thinks of Cadillac’s direction. You have bored me to death with your arrogance.

        Reply
        • Meanwhile, still waiting for a well-thought-out rebuttal to my comments from YOU.

          My pompous-ness, or lack thereof, is irrelevant here. You have presented absolutely nothing to back up your argument and are getting so mad that someone is finally calling you out on it. Sorry to burst your bubble and/or hurt your feelings.

          Reply
          • You think your tap dance is well thouught out. Okay.

            Reply
            • I still have yet to hear a factual rebuttal from you on any of my claims.

              PS: congratulations on replying correctly! I am most certainly proud of your achievement. 👏That must have been exhausting for you.

              Reply
          • thought. I am tired. Have been up since 6 AM suffering fools.

            Reply
  7. Just for your edification, as now, the reply button is not available, but if your blathering on about a reply button makes you feel confident so be it. The only button available is the Post Comment button. Maybe you should have your IT dept look at this. Your welcome.

    Reply
    • And yet here I am, replying to your comment. You sure you’re not just missing it?

      It is located beneath every single comment, in bright red.

      Reply
      • Pompous a–. Who cares. You thing you really made a point? Fool.

        Reply
        • Reverting to name-calling means you have nothing better to say or to contribute.

          You lack the skills or the maturity to maintain a spirited conversation, and revert to name-calling instead of providing counter points. You’re a real winner. You must be proud.

          Some advice for ya: if you can’t take the heat, don’t set foot in the kitchen.

          Reply
          • Pompous is not name calling it is descriptive. I lack skills or maturity? I am not making a value judgement such as you. I love the kitchen, you just whine better,.

            Reply
            • I’m referring to the following terms:
              – a–
              – Fool

              Does either help the conversation? No, they don’t… but they do further your strategy of detracting from the conversation at hand about Cadillac… which you have not contributed to.

              “I love the kitchen, you just whine better”

              Doesn’t seem like you even belong in the kitchen. You can’t even present an opposite point of view based on facts. Your entire argument sums up to you not loking Cadillac’s design language.

              Reply
  8. I am glad you believe that. Fairy tales can come true.

    Reply
  9. At least they are following through with JDN’s plan. I’m curious to see how the XT4 and refreshed CT6 will fair.

    Reply
    • Agreed. Although I have a feeling that JDN’s plan was compromised along the way thanks to Ammann, who is passionate about cutting corners to boost profits. JdN didn’t agree with this, and was shown the door.

      It will be interesting how the CT6 will do, given the situation with sedans in the general marketplace… but I imagine it staying around the 1,000 a month mark (total sales volume). The XT4 will do 3-6 thousand units a month, if positioned and marketed correctly.

      Reply
      • Ya. Under this new management, I highly doubt the Escala will ever be built. I hope the executives at least follow in JDN’s vision for utilizing high-quality materials in their future vehicles.

        Reply
  10. The XT4 will sell because SUVs sell in today’s market. The CT6 is a failure, though I liked driving it, until they change the styling and technical details, but it is drippy boring styling. MAYBE when they stop producing the XTS the sales will increase because of Cadillac loyalists not because they love it.

    Reply
    • The CT6 is a failure by whose standards, yours? Care to elaborate on that really well thought-out conclusion?

      Reply
      • The XTS is outselling the CT6. I told you it drives nicely. Love the Array Sound. Nothing else impressive. You better read some magazines and Autoextremist, since your opinion is the only well thought out position.

        Reply
        • Oh, your logic is stupendous!

          According to you, a cheaper vehicle (XTS) outselling a more expensive one (CT6) makes a more expensive vehicle (CT6) a failure. Man, I really hope you don’t have any real decision-making professional responsibilities with that line of thinking. If you do, we’re all in trouble!

          Allow me to educate you: the XTS outsells the CT6 because:
          1. It’s cheaper
          2. It’s offered to fleets, while the CT6 is not
          3. It’s offered to livery customers, while the CT6 is not

          Those are the facts, backed up by hard data. But I’m sure you’re going to try to paint them as “excuses”.

          The Lexus ES outsells the Lexus LS. Does that make the LS a failure? The Chevy Cruze outsells the Corvette, which must make the Corvette a failure, according to you.

          Bottom line is that the CT6 does everything better than the XTS. How long did you even drive a CT6 for to reach your conclusion that “nothing else is impressive” about it?

          Sure, I consider others’ opinions, but I reach my own that are based on a decade’s worth of professional experience in the automotive industry.

          Reply
  11. I loved our 2008 CTS Perf Luxury vehicle, and my wife loves her 2015 ATS Sport Coupe. Unfortunately, Cadillac has nothing else (exception V for perf not looks) for the sedan or coupe driver. Styling counts, GM used to lead the way now they follow.

    Reply
    • “Styling counts, GM used to lead the way now they follow.”

      More subjective opinion about styling.

      Here’s another take: Cadillac models continue to be the most unique in their respective segments. They’re instantly the most recognizable on the road.

      Reply
  12. I cannot stand your bs replies. Lexus, MB, BMW etc. outsell Cadillac because Cadillac needs to exceed not equal those brands. They are ending XTS hoping CT6 will pick up in sales. Your logic defies logic.

    Reply
    • Who said that Cadillac should “equal” MB, BMW, etc?

      Your statement about Cadillac “ending XTS hoping CT6 will pick up in sales” is a conclusion only you are making. Show me one example where anyone from Cadillac has stated that the strategy involves converting XTS owners to the CT6.

      “I cannot stand your bs replies”.

      And yet, you still have not replied with any kind of substance. All you do is complain about the highly subjective topic of design, and think that it negatively impacts sales, without understanding that the design is Cadillac’s greatest asset… and that it sells less than the competition because the brand itself is weaker than those of its most direct rivals.

      Reply
      • You are the whiner. No vested interest in Cadillac sales, though I would like them to be number 1 in the US again. Just like I would like GM to be number one. BS away. No one but you and Ricky. Again why don’t you look at Autoextremist for another opinion, and any car mag. Waah, for you. Genius.

        Reply
        • So besides name calling, what is your purpose here?

          Reply
  13. Most unique on the road? You are kidding.
    I want Cadillac to succeed. I want Cadillac to be better. I want Cadillac to supply American jobs. Please stop with your childishness, and take some time out in corner. Please note anyone, even I, and be as condescending as you.

    Reply
    • So let me get this right: you stating that you dislike Cadillac styling is all good. When I state the opposite, you get all offended.

      You still have yet to respond to any one of my comments with anything substantial. All you do is whine about the highly-subjective topic of design. Do you have any other arguments, or are you out of ideas?

      Reply
      • To use your phraseology prove something. You had no ideas just repeat the same old. Design is subjective of course almost anything is that is why they even have industrial designers. Just mostly boring design so I say, and most who buy the competition, and more do. Don’t forget GM used to sell 50% of US sales because they had the most innovative and exciting design. You are just ignorant of history. It is not your fault. Stop already.

        Reply
        • I’ve proven plenty. Meanwhile, you have yet to provide any reasonable response to any of my comments. All you have done is complain about Cadillac’s design. By comparison, I have provided a rebuttal to every single one of the false comments you have had previously (such as why JdN left Infiniti)… and you have yet to answer any one of those comments because you know you are wrong and you have nothing to say.

          I’ll say it again: the majority of the car-buying public does not subscribe to your negative opinion about the design of current Cadillac vehicles.

          Besides subjective comments regarding design, do you have any other comments regarding Cadillac vehicles? Do you have anything else to contribute?

          And if you want to go back in history, why don’t you explain why Cadillac sold so well in the past in the United States and why it never sold well outside of this market. I have a feeling that you won’t do it, since doing so is too much for your feeble little brain.

          Reply
          • You think you’ve proven plenty, you haven’t.
            I don’t want to give you a history lesson on big American cars, huge US car market, big US highways. How our car mag writers, and politicians thought only fair to make cars like Europe and Asia, and give preferred status to these cars as compared to tariffs and etc. against US made cars. How mag writers said Amer cars too big, they couldn’t handle. Now American too small, and outhandle competition so writers say. Look at all the big foreign cars how amazing they are. Too bad American cars can out handle competition, but don’t have size or luxury of Europeans and etc.. Who cares about 9 speed auto, or 8 speed auto or who has only 10 speed in class? Only those of us that love cars not the majority. That is why Lexus,Toyota, BMW eat our lunch in our own markets. People care about the persona not the car. Cadillac has lost the persona, sorry I love to drive a Cadillac that looks different than the competition and outperforms it.
            This is going nowhere, you think you prove something, and I believe you are talking to yourself and Ricky like people.

            Reply
      • Whine, whine. Then say someone else is whining. You sound like a committed Leftie.

        Reply
        • Don’t think I ever whined.

          You, on the other hand, never addressed any of the items I mentioned. All you did is make inflammatory comments and try to detract from the actual topic at hand. If you focused even half the energy on making a logical counter point as you spend trying to stir the pot and try to label others with pathetic words, you would have much better results, both here and in life.

          And nice try bringing politics into this. This is a discussion about cars, not politics. Head elsewhere if you are looking to talk politics.

          Reply
          • Everything is politics. I answeted you, you just didn’t like the answers, just as I didn’t like your answers
            . I am tired of this.

            Reply
  14. Alex, youre wasting your time with this guy, bud. Obvious he is just an idiot with an opinion. You called him out on it and now he thinks his life depends on defending himself but he doesn’t have the tools or the brains or the knowledge to do it… so he is trying to attack you personally. Just let him be, he will never get it.

    Reply
  15. Ricky, obviously you’re a genius and you are so right. You and Alex are so intelligent. Maybe both of you will win Nobel Prizes for the position papers you have written. You two have all the brains, and poor little me has nothing. I am proud of you and your IQ.

    Reply
    • What is it that you are arguing for Michael? What is your purpose?

      Reply
    • Mikey it’s so sad that you feel the need to turn a perfectly good discussion into a pissing match. Everyone else reading this is laughing, not with you but rather at you. Alex pointed out the flaws in your thinking and instead of accepting it, you got all pissy like a little boy whose mommy told him no.

      Reply
      • Ricky my name has never been Mikey. You believe that denigrates me, so be it. I don’t realky care about your comments or interjection. Just leave your mommy’s basement, and get a job.

        Reply
  16. We had our 2008 CTS delivered before introduction and delivered in Sept. 2007. Purchased ATS coupe in Nov 2014, you are not ahead of curve. A better CUE, though we have had no difficulty with, that every car mag complained about for years what an advance. I would not say selling like hotcakes, selling at disappointing rate.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Lost Password

Please enter your username or email address. You will receive a link to create a new password via email.

Skip to toolbar